Comments on: So You Want To Sell Music In China? (updated) http://www.theglobaloutpost.com/archives/14 Real World, Music Industry Views Sun, 25 Jun 2017 17:14:34 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.2.2 By: Ziyu Pan http://www.theglobaloutpost.com/archives/14#comment-2470 Ziyu Pan Thu, 26 Mar 2015 00:44:46 +0000 http://www.theglobaloutpost.com/archives/14#comment-2470 [...] Users in Chinese have a lot of opinions when they are given free access to all music works. In the last few years, however – DSP showed that the majority of Chinese audience “do not care what they are listening to” – this perception has changed. What appears to be a depressing lack of engagement with music is probably better read as being a pervasive lack of genre awareness. Without genre, the user is limited to the most fundamental of active choices – “What mood am I in right now?” – opening up the door to a whole new era of mood-, theme- and location-related playlists. Mood, in effect, becomes the genre, with one active choice leading to hours of passive and lean back discovery. From an international repertoire perspective, this is good news. As digital service providers re-tool their once-chart-focused products to include elaborate playlist-driven curation, there is an increasing need for content to populate these playlists. The Chinese music universe is, by some estimations, between 200k and 300k songs (of wildly varying quality) and the market is around 80% domestic repertoire, so there will need to be a massive influx of good quality music to satisfy this new playlist space. While hits will always remain important, it looks like playlists may bring about the long-awaited arrival of the long tail in China, in large part from imported content. The biggest infringers are the country’s largest internet companies – Baidu, Sohu. Sogou and Yahoo China – which provide specialized “deep link” services giving direct access to millions of copyright-infringing music files. Baidu is the biggest single violator of music copyrights and by far the greatest obstacle to legisimate digital commerce in China. [...] […] Users in Chinese have a lot of opinions when they are given free access to all music works. In the last few years, however – DSP showed that the majority of Chinese audience “do not care what they are listening to” – this perception has changed. What appears to be a depressing lack of engagement with music is probably better read as being a pervasive lack of genre awareness. Without genre, the user is limited to the most fundamental of active choices – “What mood am I in right now?” – opening up the door to a whole new era of mood-, theme- and location-related playlists. Mood, in effect, becomes the genre, with one active choice leading to hours of passive and lean back discovery. From an international repertoire perspective, this is good news. As digital service providers re-tool their once-chart-focused products to include elaborate playlist-driven curation, there is an increasing need for content to populate these playlists. The Chinese music universe is, by some estimations, between 200k and 300k songs (of wildly varying quality) and the market is around 80% domestic repertoire, so there will need to be a massive influx of good quality music to satisfy this new playlist space. While hits will always remain important, it looks like playlists may bring about the long-awaited arrival of the long tail in China, in large part from imported content. The biggest infringers are the country’s largest internet companies – Baidu, Sohu. Sogou and Yahoo China – which provide specialized “deep link” services giving direct access to millions of copyright-infringing music files. Baidu is the biggest single violator of music copyrights and by far the greatest obstacle to legisimate digital commerce in China. […]

]]>
By: Glaciers Aligning: Progress In China Digital Music Industry | TechNode http://www.theglobaloutpost.com/archives/14#comment-1219 Glaciers Aligning: Progress In China Digital Music Industry | TechNode Tue, 01 Apr 2014 05:03:32 +0000 http://www.theglobaloutpost.com/archives/14#comment-1219 [...] is an increasing need for content to populate these playlists. The Chinese music universe is, by some estimations, between 200k and 300k songs (of wildly varying quality) and the market is around 80% domestic [...] […] is an increasing need for content to populate these playlists. The Chinese music universe is, by some estimations, between 200k and 300k songs (of wildly varying quality) and the market is around 80% domestic […]

]]>